Difference between revisions of "Black List check"

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[[Category:Engineering]]
 
[[Category:Engineering]]
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[[Category:Mail]]
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I hate RBL blackhole lists. They cause more problems than they solve.
  
 
I honestly think I spend more time tinkering with spam filters than I do in just deleting spam manually. I have a very public email address displayed prominently on my site and I've had the same email address for over 15 years. I get a lot of spam, but most of it I get rid of with very simple regex filters. I tried fancy Beysian filters and spamassasin. They were all more trouble than they were worth and they take up A LOT of CPU! The most annoying part of so-called smart spam filters is that they get way too many false positives. My own custom filters do get false positives, but rarely. I focus on getting rid of the easy to detect spam. After all that I still end up with maybe a 50/50 ratio of good mail to spam, but that's low enough that I don't waste much time during the day pressing the delete button.
 
I honestly think I spend more time tinkering with spam filters than I do in just deleting spam manually. I have a very public email address displayed prominently on my site and I've had the same email address for over 15 years. I get a lot of spam, but most of it I get rid of with very simple regex filters. I tried fancy Beysian filters and spamassasin. They were all more trouble than they were worth and they take up A LOT of CPU! The most annoying part of so-called smart spam filters is that they get way too many false positives. My own custom filters do get false positives, but rarely. I focus on getting rid of the easy to detect spam. After all that I still end up with maybe a 50/50 ratio of good mail to spam, but that's low enough that I don't waste much time during the day pressing the delete button.
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== AppRiver Tools ==
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There are tools here for checking multiple blackhole lists and to test your system as a relay.
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  http://tools.appriver.com/
  
 
== SURBL - Spam URI Realtime Blocklists ==
 
== SURBL - Spam URI Realtime Blocklists ==
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   http://spamblock.outblaze.com/spamchk.html
 
   http://spamblock.outblaze.com/spamchk.html
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== Distributed Sender Blackhole List DSBL ==
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  http://dsbl.org/listing
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== Composite Black List CBL ==
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  http://cbl.abuseat.org/lookup.cgi

Latest revision as of 17:43, 18 August 2008


I hate RBL blackhole lists. They cause more problems than they solve.

I honestly think I spend more time tinkering with spam filters than I do in just deleting spam manually. I have a very public email address displayed prominently on my site and I've had the same email address for over 15 years. I get a lot of spam, but most of it I get rid of with very simple regex filters. I tried fancy Beysian filters and spamassasin. They were all more trouble than they were worth and they take up A LOT of CPU! The most annoying part of so-called smart spam filters is that they get way too many false positives. My own custom filters do get false positives, but rarely. I focus on getting rid of the easy to detect spam. After all that I still end up with maybe a 50/50 ratio of good mail to spam, but that's low enough that I don't waste much time during the day pressing the delete button.

AppRiver Tools

There are tools here for checking multiple blackhole lists and to test your system as a relay.

 http://tools.appriver.com/

SURBL - Spam URI Realtime Blocklists

Use the following tool to check if an IP or domain name is in a URIBL:

 http://www.rulesemporium.com/cgi-bin/uribl.cgi

SORBS

 http://www.au.sorbs.net/lookup.shtml

Spamhaus SBL

 http://www.spamhaus.org/sbl/

Outblaze

 http://spamblock.outblaze.com/spamchk.html

Distributed Sender Blackhole List DSBL

 http://dsbl.org/listing

Composite Black List CBL

 http://cbl.abuseat.org/lookup.cgi