Difference between revisions of "Clocks"

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(New page: Category:Science == Some notes on a clock design == It all started with gears! I have an interest in gears. Most clocks require gears, so why not build a clock? This was also an expe...)
 
(Some notes on a clock design)
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== Some notes on a clock design ==
 
== Some notes on a clock design ==
  
It all started with gears! I have an interest in gears. Most clocks  
+
It all started with gears! I have an interest in gears. Most clocks require gears, so why not build a clock? This was also an experiment in rapid model design that turned out to be not so rapid. I plan to build a clock from acrylic plastic. I have been using a LASER cutter to cut 1/4 Plexiglas. This first batch of gears was cut at Freedom Arts & Manufacturing, a LASER cutting service. The following picture  
require gears, so why not build a clock? This was also an experiment in rapid  
+
shows a cutting plan for the LASER cutter to follow. Note that the voids that form the spokes of the largest gear are 16 tooth gears. This saves materials and makes an interesting spoke design. The figure at the lower right is an experimental escapement design that failed.
model design that turned out to be not so rapid. I plan to build a clock from  
+
 
acrylic plastic. I have been using a LASER cutter to cut 1/4 Plexiglas. This  
+
[image:cutplan.png]
first batch of gears was cut at <a href="http://freedomartsandmfg.com/">Freedom  
+
 
Arts &amp; Manufacturing</a> a LASER cutting service. The following picture  
+
A pendulum timed clock also requires an escapement. This is a simple component, but with many subtleties. An entire book has been written on the subject and can be ordered from [http://www.geocities.com/mvhw/antiqueclockrepair.html Mark Headrick's Horology] site.
shows a cutting plan for the LASER cuttter to follow. Note that the voids that  
+
form the spokes of the largest gear are 16 tooth gears. This saves materials  
+
and makes an interesting spoke design. The figure at the lower right is an experimental  
+
escapement design that failed.
+

Revision as of 04:47, 31 December 2007

Some notes on a clock design

It all started with gears! I have an interest in gears. Most clocks require gears, so why not build a clock? This was also an experiment in rapid model design that turned out to be not so rapid. I plan to build a clock from acrylic plastic. I have been using a LASER cutter to cut 1/4 Plexiglas. This first batch of gears was cut at Freedom Arts & Manufacturing, a LASER cutting service. The following picture shows a cutting plan for the LASER cutter to follow. Note that the voids that form the spokes of the largest gear are 16 tooth gears. This saves materials and makes an interesting spoke design. The figure at the lower right is an experimental escapement design that failed.

[image:cutplan.png]

A pendulum timed clock also requires an escapement. This is a simple component, but with many subtleties. An entire book has been written on the subject and can be ordered from Mark Headrick's Horology site.